WEBMU 2008 — Bremen (and Bremerhaven)

Bremen WEBMU 2008Rolled back into town a couple hours ago after a 6-hour trip back to Regensburg from Bremen for the 4th annual Whiny Explat Blogger Meetup. The trip went smoothly, despite several long delays in the train schedule. Try not to spend a layover in the Würzburg Hbf if you can help it (ugh…).

Big, big thanks to Claire for her organizational wizardry and friendly welcome packets, waiting for us at our respective hotels (even ours, 25 minutes out into the burbs via tram line). How she managed to get the weather to be just perfect, I’ll never know.

This was our first meetup and I’m sure it won’t be our last. It was great fun meeting in person the authors and commenters of many of the blogs we read. I would be tickled to have any of them give us a call (or even better, an email) when they plan to visit Regensburg or meet up with them for a drink or a meal or museum outing or something when our travels bring us to their towns. Easiest way I can think of to avoid those “Aw, shucks, had I known you were going to be in town…” realizations? Sign up for dopplr and connect to me or Sarah. You can follow our travel plans via that site, or RSS, or email. It’s really, really, intuitive and (this is the best part) extremely unobtrusive. And no, we’re not getting points or referral bonuses or anything like that. I first heard about dopplr from a banner on J’s blog and since then, four different expatriate blog authors I read have also shared their travel plans with me/us. How cool would that be to discover I know someone who’ll be in Romania or Berlin or Paris the same week that I am?

Here are the best shots I got from the trip:

the small town weekend edition

receiving lineSome people might have trouble believing it gets smaller than Regensburg, but Sarah and I confirmed this weekend once again that it sure can.

We had the honor and pleasure of attending our pals Jentry and Markus’ wedding again this year. I say “again” because last year we attended their Standesamtliche ceremony. That was nice, but little did we know that was just a cursory wedding. The “real” one was last night and it was a humdinger.

This is what we’d thought out for ourselves, geography-wise for the weekend (below). Alas, it didn’t quite work out that way, but all was not lost.

We got up really early, got our nice duds on, picked up our rental car and headed north to Hirschau. We got there about 2 hours too early, planning to walk around the town’s Herbstmarkt. About five minutes later, we were looking for some other way to kill the rest of our time. We ducked (out of the cold and) into the church to catch the last few notes of the music group’s rehearsal. I could tell right away that this was going to be quite a musically diverse weekend: it was “My Guy” — or rather “My God” as made famous by Sister Act.

The wedding itself was pretty straightforward, except for selections from Godspell and other various pop love songs I’d never heard at weddings in the U.S. (and the priest was looking pretty bemused at times during the musical numbers), but upon exiting the mass, we got a very different musical flavor.



That’s Markus’ band. They march in parades all over Germany. They were great.

After the wedding, we drove to the Kuhdorf* where the reception was being held. We, along with the other guests, got treated to some of this:

We were really impressed with that band. They’re called Tequila Sunrise and they’re based in Neunburg vorm Wald. They played for something like 12 hours — and they were continuously excellent in everything they did. Wedding reception classics like “Proud Mary” or traditional Bavarian folk music — they played it all, with lots of interaction and enthusiasm, including an hour’s worth of party games at a “secret” nearby bar where all the guests snuck off to with the bride (the famous Brautentführung — bridal kidnapping) . Each band member played at least two instruments and they switched off on lead vocals. Here’s what parts they seemed to be playing the most:

Rock Bayerisch
Keyboards Akkordeon
Guitar Saxhorn?
Bass Guitar Trompete
Saxophone Klarinette
Drums Mobile percussion device of some sort — a tambourine (beaten with a drumstick), jingle bells and a washboard rolled into one

Later on in the evening, Markus’ family and friends put on a dance show for the rest of us to enjoy:

    

Mix all that up with great food and friendly fellow guests and a comfortable (and cheap!) night’s stay with breakfast at the inn (attached to the reception hall) and that yields one pleasant glimpse into small-town wedding celebrations we probably never would have experienced, otherwise.

The next morning after breakfast, we’d planned to check out Rothenburg ob der Tauber, which is famous for being one of the most often photographed spots in Germany. I’d been there years ago with my parents and sister, but Sarah never had. Unfortunately, weather, traffic and an astoundingly difficult to use navigation device in our rented Fiat (must go well with the Italian highway system) all conspired against us, and we wound up spending a couple hours on the road for nought. But we still did get to visit Kallmünz on Christina G’s recommendation, especially with regard to the tiny little restaurant near the East bank of the Naab river: zum Bürstenbinder. She said they specialized in Schupfnudeln (a.k.a Fingernudeln — think German gnocchi if you’ve never had them before) . She wasn’t kidding. Variations on that theme were the only thing we could find on the menu. But they sure hit the spot with a nice tall, chilled sparkling apple juice. Before having our late lunch there, we walked around town on both sides of the river and despite the rain and cloudy conditions, managed to shoot these:


Kallmünz on the Naab p9214436 Kallmünz on the Naab

Homemade Tomato Soup

Cliff is a big proponent of eating grilled cheese sandwiches and tomato soup when the weather starts getting chilly. I’ve never been all that jazzed about it – thus far, all of the tomato soups I’ve tried here have been either repulsive or so acidic that I end up with raging heartburn. So I finally broke down and searched for a tomato soup recipe. I found a winner here, but the proportions need tweaking. My version is below, calling for much less dairy than the original.

8 tomatoes, peeled*, seeded and roughly chopped (they’re getting boiled and blended anyway)
1.5 L (50 oz) tomato juice
15-20 leaves fresh basil
2 T c heavy cream
1 1/2 T butter
pinch sugar
salt and pepper to taste

Bring tomatoes and juice to a boil over medium heat. Simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add basil and pulse in blender or process with immersion blender until smooth. Over medium low heat, stir in cream, butter, sugar, salt and pepper until heated through. Do not boil or the cream will curdle.

*Do you know how to peel a tomato? I’d always heard you’re supposed to stick a whole tomato on the end of a fork, then immerse it in boiling water for 30-60 seconds. Jesus, that sounds like a trip to the emergency room (complete with tomato-shaped burn scars) just waiting to happen. If you have a gas stove, there is an easier way: stick your whole tomato on the end of a fork and roast the tomato in a burner flame (medium high worked for me), turning it slowly to get most of the flesh in the flame for about 5 seconds (if the skin turns black, blisters or pops, you’re done – turn that thing!). Don’t burn yourself trying to get every square inch – as long as you get most of it, you’re fine. Then, quarter the tomatoes to seed them. If you roasted them well enough, you should notice the skin starting to pull away from the cut edges. You can pull the skin up from the loose edge and peel the tomatoes now.

astute observation

A friend of ours was getting her political discourse on and watched this interview in preparation.

Her reaction to it:

She was reminding me of {name removed to protect the nice-but-stupid}. The reason I say that is that she seems like she is totally in over her head, but she can BS enough to look good to people who are as stupid as she is.

That struck me as the most astute observation I’ve heard yet from someone I know personally. Sarah Palin may be able to pull the wool over some or even most of the voting public’s eyes, but that stuff around seven minutes into the interview sure won’t fly as soon as she’s called upon to represent the U.S. in anything international.

I mean, I know she’s evil. Outlawing abortion, pork barrel spending, blurring the separation of church and state, and book bannings: those are all things that I expect from politicians whose positions conflict with my own. From her policy standpoint, clearly, I think she’d be bad for the country. I can sort of accept that those kinds of candidates exist.

But based on her statements in the interview above, where she’s flying solo in response to questions and challenges posed to her instead of charming her supporters and belittling her opponents in prepared statements with no opportunity for spontaneous dialog, it’s clear to me that Sarah Palin is simply unprepared to lead the nation. Matt Damon seems to think so, too:

What exactly did the McCain camp expect her to come up with when the time comes to show what she knows? We know she got elected to govern Alaska because pretty much everyone else in Alaskan government was corrupt and Alaska desperately looked to the least familiar face in the game. And it was pretty. And maybe that and some hockey mom tactics was enough for Alaska. But we as a nation really need more than that.

I am dreading having to explain to my coworkers how she could even be considered for the job.

praise from the customer

Ok Cliff, sorry, sometimes seems like I think you are the only one working on this org.

Got the above email from an internal customer on my way back from a 4-day trip for a 3-day training in Düsseldorf.

It’s nice to get recognition like that now and then. Even when everything else is going wrong/slowly/badly/to hell if I make an impression like that, I must be doing OK.

Note to self: bring that email to your annual review…

Senator Jim Inhofe — what a slimeball

He thinks if you can't see it, you won't believe it
He thinks if you can't see it, you won't believe it.
Attention Oklahomans:

Please vote this guy out of office. He is insulting you. Here’s a quote from a Tulsa newspaper from him about the decision voters will have to make:

“Do you really want to have a guy as commander in chief of this country when you can question whether or not he really loves his country?” he asked.

“That’s the big question.”

Aroo? Barack Obama’s love for his country is questionable? The article continues:

After he was asked for an explanation on why voters should question Obama’s love for his country, Inhofe issued a written statement on Friday to clarify his earlier comments.

“Let me be clear,” he said.

“I am not questioning Sen. Obama’s patriotism, but you have to question why at times he seems so obviously opposed to public displays of patriotism and national pride, like wearing an American flag lapel pin.”

Inhofe said Americans can show pride in their country in different ways but suggested all should be straightforward.

OK, let me get this straight. Senator Inhofe would have you believe the following:

  1. Patriotism and love of country are two separate issues.
  2. Not indulging in public displays of patriotism and national pride casts doubt upon one’s love of country (though not one’s patriotism, right Senator?).
  3. All ways of showing pride in ones country should be straightforward.

That’s a pretty hefty load. I’m willing to let the first point slide by as a politician’s attempt to wiggle out of a statement he shouldn’t have made. But the other two are unforgivable. Senator Inhofe wants you, his electorate, to be able to judge who is patriotic and who is not with simple, obvious, visual clues.

So you don’t have to trouble yourself with any sort of subtle truth. Oklahomans, I hope you feel insulted. But that’s not all! Perusing the Senator’s entry on Wikipedia, I came across these gems:

  • He thinks global warming is a hoax perpetrated by The Weather Channel so as to attract greater numbers of viewers.
  • He thinks the separation of church and state as a founding principle of the United States is an even bigger hoax than Global Warming.
  • He suggested that the U.S. earned the 9/11 attacks as punishment from God for not sticking up for Israel more.
  • He is proud that no one in his family has ever been divorced or involved in any kind of homosexual relationship.

Actually, on that last point there, it is pretty cool that no one in his family has ever been divorced. Not many families can say that and I hope it is a testament to the spouses’ commitments to each other. But to be proud of not ever having had a homosexual relationship in the family is like being proud that no one in your family has ever had blue eyes.

So please, good citizens of OKlahoma, realize what this scumbag really thinks of you — and the majority of U.S. citizens — and help him get a new job.

“You are what you eat”…uh…”Moo?”

This has been a very dairy weekend.

    Friday at Chez Tammy et Matthias :

  • homemade pizza — featuring feta-stuffed peperoncini
  • Two, count ’em two kinds of excellent ice cream for dessert: Chunky Monkey and Wiener Melange

We didn’t eat very much meat this weekend. I suppose I could see going vegetarian if I had a compelling reason to do so*, but I sure can’t picture cutting dairy out of my diet.

Individual Cheesecakes

I started with this recipe but quickly made it my own thing.

Baker’s Joy (or just butter), for greasing the pan
graham cracker crumbs, for the bottoms of the cupcake pans
2 eggs, separated
3/8 cup sugar
200g cream cheese, softened (that’s one small German-sized package — a little smaller than the 8 oz. size typical in the U.S.)
1 tablespoon of sour cream
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 350°F. Butter the cups of a mini-muffin pan and put a half a centimeter of graham cracker crumbs in the bottom of each cup; set aside.

Cream egg yolks, sugar, vanilla, sour cream and cream cheese until fluffy. Beat egg whites until stiff; fold into creamed mixture.

Spoon cream cheese mixture into muffin tins, filling three-fourths full. Bake in preheated oven for 20 minutes. Cool 10 to 15 minutes. Carefully remove from muffin tins. Let ’em cool, then try to save at least a couple to show people outside your kitchen that you actually made them. Makes 10 cupcake-sized cheesecakes. They come out of the oven poofy at first, but form little depressions as they cool, which would probably be great for some Lemon Sauce or other fruit sauces