No more Netto in Stadtamhof — at least not until 2011

I got this information from TV Aktuell, the local TV station.

Our neighborhood grocery store closed last Monday, leaving our island in the Danube even more isolated. We’ve got no bus service due to the Protzenweiher Brücke being closed to traffic since it melted as a result of a barge collision a couple years ago. Up til now, Netto was very convenient and perhaps a reason why the citizens (not us) and inhabitants (us) have not yet revolted about the delayed bridge repairs and bus routes and transportation issues.

But I wonder if this was the last straw. One of the contributing factors when we decided to move here was the relative quiet — there’s really not a lot of car traffic around here, considering how close to the main drag we live, and all the businesses directly on it. But another major contributing factor was the availability of a supermarket, biomarkt, bakery, and butcher one 30-second walk out the front door of our building. Scratch the supermarket option, I guess.

Apparently, here’s what’s going on:

  • The owner of the building housing the Netto store needs to renovate the building (and this is obvious to anyone who walks by — it’s decrepit).
  • While the renovation is happening, no grocery store or anything else is going to be there.
  • The city of Regensburg pleaded with Netto to set up shop in another vacant building on the island and even offered to pay for a tent or something as a temporary shop, but Netto refused.
  • Renovation is scheduled to begin by March 2010.
  • Another grocery store — perhaps even Netto again — will set up shop in that building after the renovation is complete starting sometime in 2011.
  • So, this will be at least a year of hiking across the bridge back to the grocery stores we mostly used before we moved, unless they open up the Steinerne Brücke to bus traffic or fix the Protzenweiher Brücke and enable bus traffic via that route.

Here’s some local reaction. For the language enthusiasts, note the diversity of accents. It ranges from nearly hochdeutsch to pretty deep oberpfälzisch. Pretty representative of the various flavors of language we confront every day. Those of you who have visited Regensburg know what I’m talking about.

Garlic Bread

Our Netto practically across the street from us has closed with very little warning (about a week). This is bad news; it means the only grocery store on the island is the Biomarkt next to the Netto. Not that the Biomarkt itself is inherently bad, but the selection is not terribly good and everything there is expensive. One of the things we won’t be able to just stop in and pick up at Netto anymore is frozen bake-it-yourself garlic bread.

But then I found this recipe — and maybe that’s a silver lining. This is fast, easy, cheap, and most importantly, tasty.

1 baguette
5 T (62g) butter, softened
2 t olive oil
3 large cloves garlic, crushed
1 t oregano
salt and pepper to taste
a little shredded cheese (we like fluffy parmesan)

Cut the baguette in half the long way, splitting it open. Cut the halves into serving-sized pieces. In a small bowl, mix butter, olive oil, garlic, oregano, salt and pepper. Spread the mixture evenly on the bread slices. On a medium baking sheet, arrange the slices evenly and broil a few minutes, until slightly brown. Check frequently so they do not burn. Remove from broiler. Top with cheese and return to broiler another minute or two, until cheese is slightly brown and melted. Serve at once.