Fun Things to do around Puerto Vallarta: Whale Watching

In December 2019, we spent a couple weeks at one of our usual vacation destinations. But we did a ton of new stuff.  See all our posts tagged with Puerto Vallarta.

We’ve done some whale watching before — about 10 years ago, to be precise. That time, we took a bus up to Punta Mita, got out, headed for the beach and waited for someone with a boat to approach us and make us an offer. It was not very scientific, but it was uncomplicated, and we saw some whales.

My location
Get Directions

This time around, we took a very different approach. Continue reading Fun Things to do around Puerto Vallarta: Whale Watching

Fun Things to do around Puerto Vallarta: Take a Taco Walk

In December 2019, we spent a couple weeks at one of our usual vacation destinations. But we did a ton of new stuff.  See all our posts tagged with Puerto Vallarta.

We’ve been to Puerto Vallarta plenty of times. Inspired by the Taco Chronicles, we wanted to discover the food we love in the place we love, but not in the restaurants we already know.

AirBnB to the rescue again! We found Memo’s tours there, but if you’re interested, you should consider booking through his website vallarta101.com. He does more than just food tours: history and culture walks are also on offer (and he gave us an inside tip that they’re expanding that area, too).

We were a mixed bag: an omnivore, a fish (and raw onion!) abstainer, and a mostlytarian. Therefore the vegetarian Taco Walk 103 made the most sense for us. Two other people joined up who were much stricter vegetarians. Our tour covered taco offerings at not-strictly-vegetarian restaurants, even though all the food we ate was.

I’m not going to blow up Memo’s spot by revealing all the neat places hiding out in the open. Suffice it to say, these restaurants — none of which we’d tried before — were all in well-known places downtown where we thought we were pretty well-versed.

But we got more than just good food out of it. Memo covered cultural, local, and regional aspects of the food and the restaurants as well. Some of the stops on the walk were high-concept fancy-pants places, and some were holes-in-the-wall we’d never have given a second look…but should have.

Three big tips for you, taco enthusiast:

  1. Arrive hungry at the meeting point.
  2. Prepare to share with someone else in your party, particularly after the first stop on the walk.
  3. Save room! Drinks and desserts are part of the package. If you fill up, you miss out.

Fun things to do around Puerto Vallarta: Roast Your Own Coffee

In December 2019, we spent a couple weeks at one of our usual vacation destinations. But we did a ton of new stuff.  See all our posts tagged with Puerto Vallarta.

Background

We are fully aware of our coffee dependency — never moreso than while hopping time zones. So we decided to Learn the Process of Coffee Roasting via this AirBnB Experience, which popped up while searching for things to do in the area. We were looking to AirBnB for inspiration after our good buddy Kristin’s recommendation to take the Pasteis de Nata baking class during our trip to Porto.

Getting There

Daniel’s coffee shop, La Cabra y La Mata, is not in Puerto Vallarta. It’s not even in Jalisco. But it’s less than an hour away by bus in Bucerías, a sleepy resort town north of Nuevo Vallarta with long stretches of beach.

We started our journey with a walk to the airport — about 20 minutes from our home base in PV — and caught a bus going towards Bucerías, or maybe La Cruz de Huanacaxtle or Sayulita. Bus fare was $20 MXN per person each way, payable in cash to the driver upon boarding and stating our destination. That works out to around a dollar or euro, depending on the exchange rate. We monitored our progress on the bus via GPS and just got out at a stop that seemed close enough.

The Shop

Coordinates: 20.75515,-105.33859


View Larger Map

The Process

Daniel gave us a brief introduction to

  • the history of coffee,
  • some terminology,
  • some industry standards,
  • the Mexican varietals,
  • and his personal techniques,

… along with some drinks (espresso, natch, but also an iced espresso over Licor 43, which was lovely) to accompany his explanations, and then it was time to get roasting. We took careful notes about the temperature, fuel, ventilation, and time at each stage of the roasting process and came home in the end with a couple 250 gram bags each of two different coffees we roasted. We were wide awake for the bus ride back to Puerto Vallarta.