Recipe Conversions

Now that our recipes are mostly online (here), it probably makes sense to post our carefully compiled conversion charts online too. We decided pretty early on after moving here, and not having a dishwasher (gasp!) that we like the metric system and weighing our stuff. It helps to limit the amount of dish washing necessary before and after a cooking project.

These conversions are what we use and we’ve developed these tables out of necessity. If you know of other handy conversions, please post them here as comments.

Butter
Flour
Shortening
Sugar
Pumkpkin Puree
Half & Half
Temperature
Yeast

Butter

You don’t really use margarine for cooking, do you?
1 tablespoon → 12.5 g
1/3 Cup → 73 g
An American stick of butter is 8 tablespoons, so one stick is 8×12.5g, or 100g

Flour

3/4 Cup → 104 g
1 Cup → 138 g
1 1/2 Cup → 207 g

Shortening (“Pflanzenfett“)

1/2 C → 90 g

Sugar
Brown Sugar

You know that squishy, moist molassey sweet stuff that every grocery store carries in at least two varieties at home in the States? Yeah, good luck getting that here. Try your local Asian market (“China Laden”); that’s where Sarah found it in Regensburg.

3/4 Cup → 157 g

Powered (Confectioner’s) Sugar

1 Cup → 148 g

White, Granulated Sugar

2/3 Cup → 140 g
3/4 Cup → 158 g
7/8 Cup → 184 g
1 Cup → 210 g

Pumpkin Puree

One cup of pumpkin puree = 330g. Presumably, a 15oz can of pumpkin puree yields two cups, but that’s pure speculation, since we generally get our pumpkin guts right from the pumpkin.

Half & Half

3 parts whole milk to one part whipping cream makes half & half. You need this for all those American ice cream recipes. Don’t ask me what double cream or heavy cream is; I only know whole milk (and various fat reductions) and Schlagsahne.
OK, fine: I’ll do the math for you.

Half-and-HalfMilkWhipping cream
cupsmlcupsmlcupsml
1.0002370.7501770.25059
1.1252660.8441770.28159
1.2502960.9382220.31374
1.3333151.0002370.33379
1.3753251.0312440.34481
1.5003551.1252660.37589
1.6253841.2192880.40696
1.6673941.2502960.41799
1.7504141.3133110.438104
1.8754441.4063330.469111
2.0004731.5003550.500118
2.1255031.5943770.531126
2.2505321.6883990.563133
2.3335521.7504140.583138
2.3755621.7814210.594140
2.5005921.8754440.625148
2.6256211.9694660.656155
2.6676312.0004730.667158
2.7506512.0634880.688163
2.8756802.1565100.719170
3.0007102.2505320.750177
3.1257392.3445550.781185
3.2507692.4385770.813192
3.3337892.5005920.833197
3.3757992.5315990.844200
3.5008282.6256210.875207
3.6258582.7196430.906214
3.7508872.8136650.938222
3.8759172.9066880.969229
4.0009463.0007101.000237
Temperature

Of course, these are the easiest to look up using something like convert-me.com. But having them here for quick reference doesn’t hurt; it’s not like they’re going to change any time soon.

°F°C
300149
310155
320160
330166
340171
350177
360182
370188
380193
390199
400204
410210
420216
430221
440227
450232
Yeast

So many recipes we have found online or elsewhere assume

  • there is only one kind of yeast, or
  • all yeast is packaged in the same way, or
  • it doesn’t matter, or
  • you know what they mean.

Those points are all really annoying.

Fortunately, we found this yeast converter online. The bonus here is that it not only converts between different kinds of yeast, but also different measurement methods: volume (e.g., cups or spoons) and mass (grams or ounces). This is especially helpful for those of us trying to follow recipes written based on teaspoons of instant or active dry yeast by substituting with grams of fresh (a.k.a cake or compressed) yeast.

We will be very sad if this site ever goes dark. Here’s the basic underlying formula, copied wholesale from that site:

1 part instant yeast (100%) = 3 parts fresh compressed yeast (300%) = 1.5 parts active dry yeast (150%)

What's your take on it?