Homemade Kansas City Meat Action

We’ve been in Kansas City for the past week or so and have been enjoying local meat. My mother-in-law does these wonderful things called Country Ribs. A quick check at Wikipedia confirms that these probably don’t technically qualify as “ribs” — but who cares? The hard part for reproducing this at home in Germany would be getting the cut of pork necessary. We don’t know how to ask for it in English (other than “Country Ribs”) let alone in German. So maybe we’ll try it with what’s available.

First she marinates them. With magic.

Then onto the grill for a bit, just until the outsides are done.

Then bring ’em back inside for the final phase: baking. She separates them by thickness and size to make sure they all bake evenly — typically the smaller, thinner ribs are done more quickly. Douse with a local barbecue sauce, and bake them until they’ve reached the right internal temperature for pork. Yum! Goes great with scalloped potatoes.

We also got a chance to visit with pals Brian and Mikey. Brian showed off his mastery of the art of discada: essentially a Mexican wok made from repurposed farm equipment and any meat you can think of. Start with bacon on low heat, and use the grease it offers up to cook the rest of your meats in stages: loose chorizo, ground beef, steak chunks, even sliced vienna sausages are in the mix. Every time you get a meat partially cooked, spread it up on the sides of the disco, where the heat is less intense, and let it continue to cook. Between meat stages, bring it all back together in the center periodically to chat. Somewhere along the way, before the chilis and onions made their appearance, Chef Brian added the better part of a bottle of beer. A final touch, when we could barely stand it anymore, was a liberal dosage of taco seasoning. Insert it directly into your mouth if you can’t help it, or if you can manage the restraint, spoon your discada into taco shells with your choice of the usual subjects (guac, sour cream, shredded cheese, pico de gallo, salsa, whatever).

Karstadt Steak Bar

19072008
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The Joint

Königstraße 14
90402 Nürnberg
Telefon 0911 – 213 0
Fax 0911 – 213 2120

Cliff

We visited the Steak Bar (I think it’s actually called “Perfetto”) in the basement of the Karstadt store near the Lorenzkirche at the suggestion of a co-worker of mine. He wasn’t wrong. The €5,99/100g Argentinian Angus was the best beef I’ve ever had in Germany. It was odd having a great steak in the basement grocery section of a department store, but maybe that added to the experience.

Sarah

Eating a steak in the subway station basement grocery of a swanky department store doesn’t sound that classy, does it? Well, surprise! It is a really nice environment. There is a small corner set up with several tables and lots of seating around the bar (accommodating about 40-50 diners at a time) and from most angles you can watch them throwing your chosen cut on to the grill. The butchers themselves come around and take orders and serve it up right, according to your wishes. My only gripe is that I asked for medium well and my meat was only just medium. But I didn’t send it back – it was my first real steak in about 5 years. I wasn’t about to waste another minute.



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